Stuffing Fantasy

½ cups soaked almonds

½ onion, chopped

2 large cloves garlic

1 apple chopped

4 stalks celery, finely chopped

1 medium Portobello mushroom, chopped

3 Tablespoon flax meal

1 Tablespoon Olive oil

1 Tablespoon Tamari or Nama Shoyu

½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1 ½ teaspoon poultry seasoning

¼ teaspoon kelp powder 1

½ cup raisins

¼ cup chopped walnuts (soaked and dehydrated first)

 

Prep

1.- place almonds in a food processor and puree until is very fine meal.

 

2.- Add onion and garlic to the food processor and process until well minced.

 

3.- Add apple, process until apples are in small chunks.

 

4.- Remove ingredients and place in a bowl.

 

6.- make patties or spread thickly on a dehydrator tray.

 

7.- Dehydrate at 105 until crunchy on the outside and moist on the inside.

 

Time will vary depending the size of your loaf or patties.Approximately 8-12 hours.

Raw No Mash Potatoes

1 1/2 cups chopped cauliflower

 

1 1/2 cups chopped parsnips

 

1/4 cup cold pressed olive oil

 

3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

 

1 teaspoon sea salt

 

½  teaspoon black pepper, or to taste.

 

Place all of the ingredients into a food processor fitted with the S-blade and process for 30 seconds or until you reach the consistency you’re happy with.

 

Serve immediately or set aside at room temperature

Pumpkin Chocolate Cheesecake (Sugar Free)

    • Makes one Large 10″ Cheesecake or 2 Small 8″ cheesecakes
    • Chocolate Sugar-Free Crust
    • 1 cup soaked and dehydrated walnuts or pecans
      1 cup ground chia seeds (black or white)
      2 cups dried coconut, ground into a powder
      6 Tablespoons powdered Lakanto or xylitol (or coconut palm sugar)
      1/4 tsp. Mineral Salt
      2 Tbs. softened or melted coconut oil (or cacao butter)
      2 tsp. cinnamon powder
      dash of cayenne
      1/4 cup cacao powder or carob powderPlace all ingredients in your food processor fitted with the “S” blade attachment.
    • Process ingredients until the crust starts to rise on the sides of the processor bowl. Stop the machine and mix with a spatula or spoon.
    • Assemble the cheesecake pan with the bottom upside-down (with lip facing down). This makes it much easier to serve
    • Rub with a little bit of coconut oil to keep the crust from sticking.
      Distribute crust evenly on the bottom of pan and firmly press down by hand and press up the sides just slightly.
      Set in a freezer or refrigerator until ready to be filled.
    • Filling: 
2 1/2 macadamia nuts
3/4 cup Irish Moss paste
3 Cups water
3/4-1 cup Xylitol (to taste) Note: you can also use coconut palm sugar here if you prefer
2 tsp. vanilla powder
1/2 tsp. turmeric powder (for nutrition and color)
1/4 tsp. mineral salt
2 Tbs. non GMO powdered soy lecithin
1cup coconut oil (softened or melted)
2-3 TBS Pumpkin Pie Spice
1 cup shredded carrots (for color)Blend all ingredients on high speed until there is a smooth, shine to the batter.
Pour 1/3 of the mixture into a cheesecake pan.Pour another 1/3 into a separate bowl and set aside.
To the last 1/3 that is still in the blender, add 2/3 cup cacao powder and blend again until smooth.Pour this on top of the “pumpkin” layer.
Zig zag the third layer that you set aside to the top of the chocolate layer and use your spatula or a chopstick to swirl the layers together.

      Don’t over mix.

      Sprinkle with cacao nibs around the outer edges if desired and let it set up in the freezer for 2 hours or more or refrigerate for 4-6 hours.

      This cheesecake will last 1 week in the refrigerator or 1 month frozen.

      Remove spring-form ring by inserting a non-serrated paring knife or hard, thin, flexible spatula along the inside edge of the pan.

      Open the spring-form, remove cheesecake, slice into 10 pieces, garnish with a mint leaf and possible a zig zag of chocolate syrup (for recipe see Elaina’s Pure Joy Kitchen Book 2) and serve!

      Store covered in your refrigerator from 4-7 days. Cheesecakes freeze well for longer storage.

      Tips: The most important thing is to blend all ingredients really well. If your blender has less than 8 cups full capacity or if your blender is struggling, blend 1/2 the recipe at a time. If the filling doesn’t taste rich and flavorful, add another small pinch of salt and maybe a little more vanilla and blend a little longer.

Chocolate/Carob Brownie By Elaina love

yields: 24-30 chocolates
2 cups soaked and dehydrated walnuts
3/8 cup xylitol or coconut palm sugar (ground into a fine powder)
6 drops of stevia or to taste
1/4 cup carob powder
1/8 cup unsweetened chocolate powder (raw cacao powder)
1/4 cup ground chia seeds (dry)
3 TBS coconut oil
1/8 tsp mineral salt (real salt or Himalayan salt)
dash of cayenne powder
4 drops vanilla essence or 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Puree in a food processor until powdered

Add the remainder of ingredients and process until the mixture is buttery
Press into heart shaped molds or shapes of your choice
refrigerate or freeze until set.
Keep refrigerated.

Sugar Free Chocolate Buttercups by Michele Marie Jeppson a Pure Joy Academy Graduate

 

    • Sugar Free Chocolate Buttercup Filling
      4 cups shredded coconut flakes
      1/2 cup +2 tablespoons coconut oil
      Place above ingredients in blender and blend until you create coconut butter.
    • Then add the following ingredients to your blender and blend until smooth:
      1/3 cup cacao butter, melted
      1/4 teaspoon carob
      1/4 teaspoon cacao
      20 drops peanut essence
      2 drops white chocolate essence
      3 tablespoons xylitol (pre-blended into powder)
      4 drops liquid stevia
    • Blend filling until smooth, then pour into bowl and place in freezer while you
      make your chocolate sauce so they harden enough to enable you to roll them into balls. (Approximately 15 minutes)Sugar Free Chocolate Sauce

      1 cup cacao powder
1/3 cup cacao butter, melted
1/2 + 1/3 cup xylitol(pre-blended into powder)
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
15 drops stevia Place sugar free chocolate into mini muffin cup candy mold, fill about 1/3rd the way
up. Get filling out of freezer and roll into balls, place filling balls into molds then
cover with additional chocolate and place into fridge to harden.

Raw Ice Cream

 

I have seen dozens of different ways to make raw vegan ice cream but this is still my favorites. The recipe is for vanilla ice cream but you can substitute just about anything to make a perfect tasty treat.

-Dr. Sal

Ingredients:

2 cups of raw cashews (soak for at least 30 minutes)

2 cups of coconut meat

1 cup of raw agave nectar (or sweetener of choice)

1/4 cup of coconut oil

4 tablespoons of vanilla extract or 10 drops of concentrated extract

1/2 teaspoon of sea salt

water as needed

 

 

 

Preparation:

Add everything in you Vita-Mix or appropriate blender with about a cup of water.  Blend into smooth adding more water as necessary (usually about another 1/4 to 1/2 cup).  Put in freezer for a few hours before serving.

 

Variations:

Chocolate– add cacao powder

Dark Chocolate– add cacao powder and 10 drops of concentrated Dark Chocolate Extract

Mint Chocolate Chip– add cacao nibs, 10 drops of concentrated Mint Extract or fresh mint leaves

Vanilla Mango– add about 1/2 cup of fresh mango

You get the idea. Enjoy!!!

Raw Peanut Butter

You can make really just about any nut butter you want.  I have always been a big peanut butter fan so this is my version.  I have also found that you can substitute various types of oils (for example using hemp or flax seed oil) to really change the omega-3 content.

Ingredients:

1 cup of wild raw peanuts

3 tbsp of cold pressed peanut oil (or hemp or flax or a combination)

1/2 tsp of himalayan rock salt

Preparation:

I actually run the peanuts through my Omega masticating juicer with the need butter attachment to turn the peanuts into a fine powder but you can also use a food processor or high speed blender.

Put the peanut powder in a food processor and add oil and salt.  Processes until smooth.

Raw Peanut Butter

Variations:

Add some raw agave nectar, raw honey or your sweetener of choice if you want a more traditional peanut butter experience.

Add some finely chopped peanuts if you like chunky peanut butter.

Add some cacao powder and your sweetener of choice if you like chocolate peanut butter.

-Dr. Sal

 

 

 

Raw Cacao Peanut Butter Cups

Ingredients:

1/2 cup cacao butter

1/4 cup of raw peanut butter

1-2 tbsp of raw agave or sweetener of choice

1/4 cup of raw cacao powder

Preparation:

For those of you who have never seen raw cacao butter it is an off white color and comes in various size chunks (see picture).

raw cacao butter

It needs to be melted. To avoid having to heat it to a super high temperature, try this: The trick here is to break it into as small a pieces as you can and than put it in a food processor or blender to turn it into flakes or a powder.

Physics tells you that the large the surface are the low the temperature need to turn it from a solid to a liquid.  So once it is in a powder/flakes form just put some hot water in a bowl and put the cacao butter flakes/powder in another bowl on top of it and it melts pretty quickly

 

 

Next add the cacao powder and raw agave nectar and mix until smooth.  In muffin tinspour about a tbsp of this mixture so it completes coats the bottom of the muffin tin. Place in freezer for about 15 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

Remove from freezer and scoop about 1 tbsp of your raw peanut butter on top.  Try to keep in from touching the sides of the muffin tin otherwise when you pour the cacao mixture on top it won’t combine with the mixture on the bottom. Pour your cacao mixture over the top of the peanut butter completely covering it.

 

 

 

Raw Cacao Peanut Butter Cup

Put back in freezer for another 15 minutes or longer, remove from muffin tin and you nowhave a healthier version of a Reese’s Peanut Butter cup.  Once hardened you can store these delicious treats either in the freezer or refrigerator.

 -Dr. Sal

 

Single or Multiple Carbohydrates Sources: which is better for performance?

First, let us be clear on one thing. Performance is all about desire, the desire to push your body to the extreme. However, do not expect great things from your body unless you treat it well. That means getting plenty of sleep, eating a healthy diet, and using a sports drink that delivers what you need when you need it.

Every sports drink out there claims to have the “right stuff” in order to improve your performance, but most of them really do not back up their claims with any real scientific data. First, let us understand the difference between improving your performance and peak performance. I can take a bag of Skittles dissolve them in my water bottle and all of a sudden I have a drink that will improve my performance. In activities over an hour, any source of carbohydrate will help improve your performance compared to water. Therefore, those “scientific” papers that show “Product X” increased their athletes’ performance when they are using water as the control groups are just stating the obvious.

Peak performance is something completely different that unfortunately the majority of us never get to experience. It is when you are good (I mean really good) and is usually reserved to the pros, semi-pros and a few seriously talented amateur athletes. These people are at the top of their sport and when they compete, in order to win, they need every bit of energy their bodies can absorb.

Now you know basically anything is better than water and most of us never achieve peak performance. Let us look at the data on single versus multiple carbohydrate sources, but first a quick chemistry lesson. Carbohydrates are one of the three major sources of calories (the others being protein and fat) in our diets. They are commonly classified as simple sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) or complex carbohydrates (oligosaccharides and polysaccharides).

Monosaccharides or “one sugar” are the simplest form of carbohydrates and cannot be broken down into any other sugars. When they are metabolized, they release energy, which is used to fuel the body. Examples of monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. Disaccharides or “two sugars” are (you guessed it) when two monosaccharides are combined together. Examples are sucrose (your common table sugar), which is fructose and glucose joined together and lactose (or milk sugar), which is glucose and galactose (another monosaccharide) joined together.

Complex carbohydrates are oligosaccharides (“few sugars”) and polysaccharides (“many sugars”). There are many different types of complex carbohydrates. The two that are probably most familiar to athletes are glycogen and maltodextrin.

Glycogen is how your body stores glucose and is just thousands of glucose molecules linked together. Glycogen is mainly stored in the liver and muscles. Your body can only store a limited amount of glycogen (about 2000 kcal) so after long periods of exertion without any energy consumption, glycogen stores become depleted (called glycogen debt) and performance significantly decreases. So next time you are on a group run or ride and you see your buddy starting to bonk, hand over one of your gels, and say “it’s time to repay your glycogen debt”. Then just smile at the confused look on his or her face.

Maltodextrin is produced from starch which is polysaccharide consisting of a large number of glucose molecules joined together. It is a very common additive in sports nutrition products, because although technically a complex carbohydrate, it is easily digestible and absorbed as rapidly as glucose. However, unlike glucose, maltodextrin is not very sweet.

So when you look at a nutrition label and it says, for example, carbohydrates 30 grams (g) and sugars 10g, what it means is that out of the total 30g of carbohydrates, 10g are monosaccharides or disaccharides (simple sugars) and the rest (20g) are oligosaccharides and polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates).

Now that your chemistry lesson is over, back to the question, which is better, a sports drink that contains just simple sugars, a sports drink that contains just complex carbohydrates, or a sports drink that contains both. It turns out there is a fair amount of good scientific data on this topic.

Your gut has a limited number of receptors to transport carbohydrates into your bloodstream. By using a drink that contains only one source of carbohydrates (whether simple or complex), you run the risk of overwhelming those receptors, transport will slow down, and this leads to less available energy. In addition, all those extra carbohydrates sitting around will cause water to leave your bloodstream to enter your gut. This situation can lead to abdominal pain, dehydration and decreased performance during exercise. Studies have shown that by using two different sources of carbohydrates (for example, maltodextrin and fructose) that are transported by different receptors you get increased absorption. This will allow you to supply more energy, faster, to metabolizing tissues which translates into better performance.

So although for the most of us Skittles in water is about as much performance enhancement we need, if you push yourself to the extreme and are not sure if your sports drink may be slowing you down learn for yourself what works best for you.  My advice keep it simple and natural.  Check out my recipe for my Pretty Unique Sports Drink.

-Dr. Sal (The Raw Cardiologist)